2H9X

NMR structure for the CgNa toxin from the sea anemone Condylactis gigantea


Experimental Data Snapshot

  • Method: SOLUTION NMR
  • Conformers Calculated: 100 
  • Conformers Submitted: 20 
  • Selection Criteria: structures with the least restraint violations 

wwPDB Validation   3D Report Full Report


This is version 1.2 of the entry. See complete history


Literature

CgNa, a type I toxin from the giant Caribbean sea anemone Condylactis gigantea shows structural similarities to both type I and II toxins, as well as distinctive structural and functional properties(1).

Salceda, E.Perez-Castells, J.Lopez-Mendez, B.Garateix, A.Salazar, H.Lopez, O.Aneiros, A.Standker, L.Beress, L.Forssmann, W.G.Soto, E.Jimenez-Barbero, J.Gimenez-Gallego, G.

(2007) Biochem J 406: 67-76

  • DOI: 10.1042/BJ20070130
  • Primary Citation of Related Structures:  
    2H9X

  • PubMed Abstract: 
  • CgNa (Condylactis gigantea neurotoxin) is a 47-amino-acid- residue toxin from the giant Caribbean sea anemone Condylactis gigantea. The structure of CgNa, which was solved by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, is somewhat atypical and displays significant homology with both type I and II anemone toxins ...

    CgNa (Condylactis gigantea neurotoxin) is a 47-amino-acid- residue toxin from the giant Caribbean sea anemone Condylactis gigantea. The structure of CgNa, which was solved by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, is somewhat atypical and displays significant homology with both type I and II anemone toxins. CgNa also displays a considerable number of exceptions to the canonical structural elements that are thought to be essential for the activity of this group of toxins. Furthermore, unique residues in CgNa define a characteristic structure with strong negatively charged surface patches. These patches disrupt a surface-exposed cluster of hydrophobic residues present in all anemone-derived toxins described to date. A thorough characterization by patch-clamp analysis using rat DRG (dorsal root ganglion) neurons indicated that CgNa preferentially binds to TTX-S (tetrodotoxin-sensitive) voltage-gated sodium channels in the resting state. This association increased the inactivation time constant and the rate of recovery from inactivation, inducing a significant shift in the steady state of inactivation curve to the left. The specific structural features of CgNa may explain its weaker inhibitory capacity when compared with the other type I and II anemone toxins.


    Related Citations: 
    • A new toxin from the sea anemone Condylactis gigantea with effect on sodium channel inactivation
      Standker, L., Beress, L., Garateix, A., Christ, T., Ravens, U., Salceda, E., Soto, E., John, H., Forssmann, W.G., Aneiros, A.
      (2006) Toxicon 48: 211

    Organizational Affiliation

    Instituto de Fisiología, Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, 14 Sur 6301, 72570 Puebla, México.



Macromolecules
Find similar proteins by:  (by identity cutoff)  |  Structure
Entity ID: 1
MoleculeChainsSequence LengthOrganismDetailsImage
Toxin CgNaA47Condylactis giganteaMutation(s): 1 
UniProt
Find proteins for P0C280 (Condylactis gigantea)
Explore P0C280 
Go to UniProtKB:  P0C280
Protein Feature View
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  • Reference Sequence
Small Molecules
Modified Residues  1 Unique
IDChainsTypeFormula2D DiagramParent
HYP
Query on HYP
AL-PEPTIDE LINKINGC5 H9 N O3PRO
Experimental Data & Validation

Experimental Data

  • Method: SOLUTION NMR
  • Conformers Calculated: 100 
  • Conformers Submitted: 20 
  • Selection Criteria: structures with the least restraint violations 
  • OLDERADO: 2H9X Olderado

Structure Validation

View Full Validation Report




Entry History 

Deposition Data

Revision History  (Full details and data files)

  • Version 1.0: 2007-06-05
    Type: Initial release
  • Version 1.1: 2008-05-01
    Changes: Version format compliance
  • Version 1.2: 2011-07-13
    Changes: Version format compliance