2H9X

NMR structure for the CgNa toxin from the sea anemone Condylactis gigantea


Experimental Data Snapshot

  • Method: SOLUTION NMR
  • Conformers Calculated: 100 
  • Conformers Submitted: 20 
  • Selection Criteria: structures with the least restraint violations 

wwPDB Validation 3D Report Full Report


This is version 1.2 of the entry. See complete history

Literature

CgNa, a type I toxin from the giant Caribbean sea anemone Condylactis gigantea shows structural similarities to both type I and II toxins, as well as distinctive structural and functional properties(1).

Salceda, E.Perez-Castells, J.Lopez-Mendez, B.Garateix, A.Salazar, H.Lopez, O.Aneiros, A.Standker, L.Beress, L.Forssmann, W.G.Soto, E.Jimenez-Barbero, J.Gimenez-Gallego, G.

(2007) Biochem.J. 406: 67-76

  • DOI: 10.1042/BJ20070130

  • PubMed Abstract: 
  • CgNa (Condylactis gigantea neurotoxin) is a 47-amino-acid- residue toxin from the giant Caribbean sea anemone Condylactis gigantea. The structure of CgNa, which was solved by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, is somewhat atypical and displays significant homology ...

    CgNa (Condylactis gigantea neurotoxin) is a 47-amino-acid- residue toxin from the giant Caribbean sea anemone Condylactis gigantea. The structure of CgNa, which was solved by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, is somewhat atypical and displays significant homology with both type I and II anemone toxins. CgNa also displays a considerable number of exceptions to the canonical structural elements that are thought to be essential for the activity of this group of toxins. Furthermore, unique residues in CgNa define a characteristic structure with strong negatively charged surface patches. These patches disrupt a surface-exposed cluster of hydrophobic residues present in all anemone-derived toxins described to date. A thorough characterization by patch-clamp analysis using rat DRG (dorsal root ganglion) neurons indicated that CgNa preferentially binds to TTX-S (tetrodotoxin-sensitive) voltage-gated sodium channels in the resting state. This association increased the inactivation time constant and the rate of recovery from inactivation, inducing a significant shift in the steady state of inactivation curve to the left. The specific structural features of CgNa may explain its weaker inhibitory capacity when compared with the other type I and II anemone toxins.


    Related Citations: 
    • A new toxin from the sea anemone Condylactis gigantea with effect on sodium channel inactivation
      Standker, L.,Beress, L.,Garateix, A.,Christ, T.,Ravens, U.,Salceda, E.,Soto, E.,John, H.,Forssmann, W.G.,Aneiros, A.
      (2006) Toxicon 48: 211


    Organizational Affiliation

    Instituto de Fisiología, Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, 14 Sur 6301, 72570 Puebla, México.




Macromolecules

Find similar proteins by: Sequence  |  Structure

Entity ID: 1
MoleculeChainsSequence LengthOrganismDetails
Toxin CgNa
A
47Condylactis giganteaMutation(s): 0 
Find proteins for P0C280 (Condylactis gigantea)
Go to UniProtKB:  P0C280
Small Molecules
Modified Residues  1 Unique
IDChainsTypeFormula2D DiagramParent
HYP
Query on HYP
A
L-PEPTIDE LINKINGC5 H9 N O3PRO
Experimental Data & Validation

Experimental Data

  • Method: SOLUTION NMR
  • Conformers Calculated: 100 
  • Conformers Submitted: 20 
  • Selection Criteria: structures with the least restraint violations 
  • Olderado: 2H9X Olderado

Structure Validation

View Full Validation Report or Ramachandran Plots



Entry History 

Deposition Data

Revision History 

  • Version 1.0: 2007-06-05
    Type: Initial release
  • Version 1.1: 2008-05-01
    Type: Version format compliance
  • Version 1.2: 2011-07-13
    Type: Version format compliance