4D1Q

Hermes transposase bound to its terminal inverted repeat


Experimental Data Snapshot

  • Method: X-RAY DIFFRACTION
  • Resolution: 3.40 Å
  • R-Value Free: 0.254 
  • R-Value Work: 0.212 
  • R-Value Observed: 0.212 

wwPDB Validation   3D Report Full Report


This is version 1.1 of the entry. See complete history


Literature

Structural Basis of Hat Transposon End Recognition by Hermes, an Octameric DNA Transposase from Musca Domestica.

Hickman, A.B.Ewis, H.E.Li, X.Knapp, J.A.Laver, T.Doss, A.Tolun, G.Steven, A.C.Grishaev, A.Bax, A.Atkinson, P.W.Craig, N.L.Dyda, F.

(2014) Cell 158: 353

  • DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2014.05.037
  • Primary Citation of Related Structures:  
    4D1Q

  • PubMed Abstract: 
  • Hermes is a member of the hAT transposon superfamily that has active representatives, including McClintock's archetypal Ac mobile genetic element, in many eukaryotic species. The crystal structure of the Hermes transposase-DNA complex reveals that Hermes forms an octameric ring organized as a tetramer of dimers ...

    Hermes is a member of the hAT transposon superfamily that has active representatives, including McClintock's archetypal Ac mobile genetic element, in many eukaryotic species. The crystal structure of the Hermes transposase-DNA complex reveals that Hermes forms an octameric ring organized as a tetramer of dimers. Although isolated dimers are active in vitro for all the chemical steps of transposition, only octamers are active in vivo. The octamer can provide not only multiple specific DNA-binding domains to recognize repeated subterminal sequences within the transposon ends, which are important for activity, but also multiple nonspecific DNA binding surfaces for target capture. The unusual assembly explains the basis of bipartite DNA recognition at hAT transposon ends, provides a rationale for transposon end asymmetry, and suggests how the avidity provided by multiple sites of interaction could allow a transposase to locate its transposon ends amidst a sea of chromosomal DNA.


    Organizational Affiliation

    Laboratory of Molecular Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Electronic address: fred.dyda@nih.gov.



Macromolecules

Find similar proteins by:  (by identity cutoff)  |  Structure
Entity ID: 1
MoleculeChainsSequence LengthOrganismDetailsImage
TRANSPOSASEA, B, G, H536Musca domesticaMutation(s): 2 
UniProt
Find proteins for Q25442 (Musca domestica)
Explore Q25442 
Go to UniProtKB:  Q25442
Protein Feature View
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  • Reference Sequence
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  • Entity ID: 2
    MoleculeChainsLengthOrganismImage
    TERMINAL INVERTED REPEATC, E, I, K15Musca domestica
    Protein Feature View
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    • Reference Sequence
    • Find similar nucleic acids by:  Sequence   |   Structure
    • Entity ID: 3
      MoleculeChainsLengthOrganismImage
      TERMINAL INVERTED REPEATD, F, J, L16Musca domestica
      Protein Feature View
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      • Reference Sequence
      Small Molecules
      Experimental Data & Validation

      Experimental Data

      • Method: X-RAY DIFFRACTION
      • Resolution: 3.40 Å
      • R-Value Free: 0.254 
      • R-Value Work: 0.212 
      • R-Value Observed: 0.212 
      • Space Group: P 32 2 1
      Unit Cell:
      Length ( Å )Angle ( ˚ )
      a = 265.15α = 90
      b = 265.15β = 90
      c = 157.64γ = 120
      Software Package:
      Software NamePurpose
      XDSdata reduction
      XDSdata scaling
      SHARPphasing
      DMphasing
      CNSrefinement

      Structure Validation

      View Full Validation Report




      Entry History 

      Deposition Data

      Revision History  (Full details and data files)

      • Version 1.0: 2014-07-30
        Type: Initial release
      • Version 1.1: 2017-06-28
        Changes: Data collection