6UI7

HBV T=4 149C3A


Experimental Data Snapshot

  • Method: ELECTRON MICROSCOPY
  • Resolution: 3.65 Å
  • Aggregation State: PARTICLE 
  • Reconstruction Method: SINGLE PARTICLE 

wwPDB Validation 3D Report Full Report


This is version 1.2 of the entry. See complete history


Literature

Expression of quasi-equivalence and capsid dimorphism in the Hepadnaviridae.

Wu, W.Watts, N.R.Cheng, N.Huang, R.Steven, A.C.Wingfield, P.T.

(2020) PLoS Comput Biol 16: e1007782-e1007782

  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1007782
  • Structures With Same Primary Citation

  • PubMed Abstract: 
  • Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a leading cause of liver disease. The capsid is an essential component of the virion and it is therefore of interest how it assembles and disassembles. The capsid protein is unusual both for its rare fold and that it polyme ...

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a leading cause of liver disease. The capsid is an essential component of the virion and it is therefore of interest how it assembles and disassembles. The capsid protein is unusual both for its rare fold and that it polymerizes according to two different icosahedral symmetries, causing the polypeptide chain to exist in seven quasi-equivalent environments: A, B, and C in AB and CC dimers in T = 3 capsids, and A, B, C, and D in AB and CD dimers in T = 4 capsids. We have compared the two capsids by cryo-EM at 3.5 Å resolution. To ensure a valid comparison, the two capsids were prepared and imaged under identical conditions. We find that the chains have different conformations and potential energies, with the T = 3 C chain having the lowest. Three of the four quasi-equivalent dimers are asymmetric with respect to conformation and potential energy; however, the T = 3 CC dimer is symmetrical and has the lowest potential energy although its intra-dimer interface has the least free energy of formation. Of all the inter-dimer interfaces, the CB interface has the least area and free energy, in both capsids. From the calculated energies of higher-order groupings of dimers discernible in the lattices we predict early assembly intermediates, and indeed we observe such structures by negative stain EM of in vitro assembly reactions. By sequence analysis and computational alanine scanning we identify key residues and motifs involved in capsid assembly. Our results explain several previously reported observations on capsid assembly, disassembly, and dimorphism.


    Organizational Affiliation

    Protein Expression Laboratory, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America.



Macromolecules

Find similar proteins by: Sequence  |  Structure

Entity ID: 1
MoleculeChainsSequence LengthOrganismDetails
Core protein
A, B, C, D
143Hepatitis B virusMutation(s): 0 
Find proteins for P03149 (Hepatitis B virus genotype A2 subtype adw (isolate Japan/Nishioka/1983))
Go to UniProtKB:  P03149
Protein Feature View
  • Reference Sequence
Experimental Data & Validation

Experimental Data

  • Method: ELECTRON MICROSCOPY
  • Resolution: 3.65 Å
  • Aggregation State: PARTICLE 
  • Reconstruction Method: SINGLE PARTICLE 

Structure Validation

View Full Validation Report



Entry History 

Deposition Data

Revision History 

  • Version 1.0: 2019-11-06
    Type: Initial release
  • Version 1.1: 2020-04-22
    Changes: Structure summary
  • Version 1.2: 2020-05-06
    Changes: Database references