6ES7

Structure and dynamics conspire in the evolution of affinity between intrinsically disordered proteins


Experimental Data Snapshot

  • Method: SOLUTION NMR
  • Conformers Calculated: 100 
  • Conformers Submitted: 20 
  • Selection Criteria: target function 

wwPDB Validation 3D Report Full Report


This is version 1.1 of the entry. See complete history

Literature

Structure and dynamics conspire in the evolution of affinity between intrinsically disordered proteins.

Jemth, P.Karlsson, E.Vogeli, B.Guzovsky, B.Andersson, E.Hultqvist, G.Dogan, J.Guntert, P.Riek, R.Chi, C.N.

(2018) Sci Adv 4: eaau4130-eaau4130

  • DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aau4130
  • Primary Citation of Related Structures:  

  • PubMed Abstract: 
  • In every established species, protein-protein interactions have evolved such that they are fit for purpose. However, the molecular details of the evolution of new protein-protein interactions are poorly understood. We have used nuclear magnetic reson ...

    In every established species, protein-protein interactions have evolved such that they are fit for purpose. However, the molecular details of the evolution of new protein-protein interactions are poorly understood. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate the changes in structure and dynamics during the evolution of a protein-protein interaction involving the intrinsically disordered CREBBP (CREB-binding protein) interaction domain (CID) and nuclear coactivator binding domain (NCBD) from the transcriptional coregulators NCOA (nuclear receptor coactivator) and CREBBP/p300, respectively. The most ancient low-affinity "Cambrian-like" [540 to 600 million years (Ma) ago] CID/NCBD complex contained less secondary structure and was more dynamic than the complexes from an evolutionarily younger "Ordovician-Silurian" fish ancestor (ca. 440 Ma ago) and extant human. The most ancient Cambrian-like CID/NCBD complex lacked one helix and several interdomain interactions, resulting in a larger solvent-accessible surface area. Furthermore, the most ancient complex had a high degree of millisecond-to-microsecond dynamics distributed along the entire sequences of both CID and NCBD. These motions were reduced in the Ordovician-Silurian CID/NCBD complex and further redistributed in the extant human CID/NCBD complex. Isothermal calorimetry experiments show that complex formation is enthalpically favorable and that affinity is modulated by a largely unfavorable entropic contribution to binding. Our data demonstrate how changes in structure and motion conspire to shape affinity during the evolution of a protein-protein complex and provide direct evidence for the role of structural, dynamic, and frustrational plasticity in the evolution of interactions between intrinsically disordered proteins.


    Organizational Affiliation

    Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University, BMC Box 582, SE-75123 Uppsala, Sweden.




Macromolecules

Find similar proteins by: Sequence  |  Structure

Entity ID: 1
MoleculeChainsSequence LengthOrganismDetails
Nuclear receptor coactivator 3
A
44Homo sapiensMutation(s): 0 
Gene Names: NCOA3 (AIB1, BHLHE42, RAC3, TRAM1)
EC: 2.3.1.48
Find proteins for Q9Y6Q9 (Homo sapiens)
Go to Gene View: NCOA3
Go to UniProtKB:  Q9Y6Q9
Entity ID: 2
MoleculeChainsSequence LengthOrganismDetails
CREB-binding protein
B
50Homo sapiensMutation(s): 0 
Gene Names: CREBBP (CBP)
EC: 2.3.1.48
Find proteins for Q92793 (Homo sapiens)
Go to Gene View: CREBBP
Go to UniProtKB:  Q92793
Experimental Data & Validation

Experimental Data

  • Method: SOLUTION NMR
  • Conformers Calculated: 100 
  • Conformers Submitted: 20 
  • Selection Criteria: target function 

Structure Validation

View Full Validation Report or Ramachandran Plots



Entry History 

Deposition Data

  • Deposited Date: 2017-10-19 
  • Released Date: 2018-10-31 
  • Deposition Author(s): Chi, N.C.

Revision History 

  • Version 1.0: 2018-10-31
    Type: Initial release
  • Version 1.1: 2018-11-14
    Type: Data collection, Database references