2EX3

Bacteriophage phi29 DNA polymerase bound to terminal protein


Experimental Data Snapshot

  • Method: X-RAY DIFFRACTION
  • Resolution: 3.00 Å
  • R-Value Free: 0.229 
  • R-Value Work: 0.200 
  • R-Value Observed: 0.203 

wwPDB Validation 3D Report Full Report


This is version 1.3 of the entry. See complete history


Literature

The phi29 DNA polymerase:protein-primer structure suggests a model for the initiation to elongation transition

Kamtekar, S.Berman, A.J.Wang, J.Lazaro, J.M.de Vega, M.Blanco, L.Salas, M.Steitz, T.A.

(2006) EMBO J 25: 1335-1343

  • DOI: 10.1038/sj.emboj.7601027
  • Structures With Same Primary Citation

  • PubMed Abstract: 
  • The absolute requirement for primers in the initiation of DNA synthesis poses a problem for replicating the ends of linear chromosomes. The DNA polymerase of bacteriophage phi29 solves this problem by using a serine hydroxyl of terminal protein to pr ...

    The absolute requirement for primers in the initiation of DNA synthesis poses a problem for replicating the ends of linear chromosomes. The DNA polymerase of bacteriophage phi29 solves this problem by using a serine hydroxyl of terminal protein to prime replication. The 3.0 A resolution structure shows one domain of terminal protein making no interactions, a second binding the polymerase and a third domain containing the priming serine occupying the same binding cleft in the polymerase as duplex DNA does during elongation. Thus, the progressively elongating DNA duplex product must displace this priming domain. Further, this heterodimer of polymerase and terminal protein cannot accommodate upstream template DNA, thereby explaining its specificity for initiating DNA synthesis only at the ends of the bacteriophage genome. We propose a model for the transition from the initiation to the elongation phases in which the priming domain of terminal protein moves out of the active site as polymerase elongates the primer strand. The model indicates that terminal protein should dissociate from polymerase after the incorporation of approximately six nucleotides.


    Organizational Affiliation

    Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8114, USA.



Macromolecules

Find similar proteins by: Sequence  |  Structure

Entity ID: 1
MoleculeChainsSequence LengthOrganismDetails
DNA polymerase
A, C, E, G, I, K
575Bacillus virus phi29Mutation(s): 2 
Gene Names: 2
EC: 2.7.7.7 (PDB Primary Data), 3.1.11 (UniProt)
Find proteins for P03680 (Bacillus phage phi29)
Go to UniProtKB:  P03680
Protein Feature View
  • Reference Sequence

Find similar proteins by: Sequence  |  Structure

Entity ID: 2
MoleculeChainsSequence LengthOrganismDetails
DNA terminal protein
B, D, F, H, J, L
230Bacillus virus phi29Mutation(s): 0 
Gene Names: 3
Find proteins for P03681 (Bacillus phage phi29)
Go to UniProtKB:  P03681
Protein Feature View
  • Reference Sequence
Small Molecules
Ligands 1 Unique
IDChainsName / Formula / InChI Key2D Diagram3D Interactions
PB
Query on PB

Download CCD File 
A, C, E, G, I, K
LEAD (II) ION
Pb
RVPVRDXYQKGNMQ-UHFFFAOYSA-N
 Ligand Interaction
Experimental Data & Validation

Experimental Data

  • Method: X-RAY DIFFRACTION
  • Resolution: 3.00 Å
  • R-Value Free: 0.229 
  • R-Value Work: 0.200 
  • R-Value Observed: 0.203 
  • Space Group: C 1 2 1
Unit Cell:
Length ( Å )Angle ( ˚ )
a = 304.933α = 90
b = 220.281β = 45.4
c = 217.165γ = 90
Software Package:
Software NamePurpose
DENZOdata reduction
SCALEPACKdata scaling
REFMACrefinement
PDB_EXTRACTdata extraction
HKL-2000data reduction
PHASERphasing

Structure Validation

View Full Validation Report



Entry History 

Deposition Data

Revision History 

  • Version 1.0: 2006-03-14
    Type: Initial release
  • Version 1.1: 2008-05-01
    Changes: Version format compliance
  • Version 1.2: 2011-07-13
    Changes: Advisory, Version format compliance
  • Version 1.3: 2017-10-18
    Changes: Refinement description