1QPM

NMR STRUCTURE OF THE MU BACTERIOPHAGE REPRESSOR DNA-BINDING DOMAIN


Experimental Data Snapshot

  • Method: SOLUTION NMR
  • Conformers Calculated: 50 
  • Conformers Submitted: 26 
  • Selection Criteria: STRUCTURES WITH ACCEPTABLE COVALENT GEOMETRY,STRUCTURES WITH FAVORABLE NON- BOND ENERGY,STRUCTURES WITH THE LEAST RESTRAINT VIOLATIONS,STRUCTURES WITH THE LOWEST ENERGY 

wwPDB Validation 3D Report Full Report


This is version 1.2 of the entry. See complete history

Literature

NMR structure and functional studies of the Mu repressor DNA-binding domain.

Ilangovan, U.Wojciak, J.M.Connolly, K.M.Clubb, R.T.

(1999) Biochemistry 38: 8367-8376

  • DOI: 10.1021/bi990530b

  • PubMed Abstract: 
  • The repressor protein of bacteriophage Mu establishes and maintains lysogeny by shutting down transposition functions needed for phage DNA replication. It interacts with several repeated DNA sequences within the early operator, preventing transcripti ...

    The repressor protein of bacteriophage Mu establishes and maintains lysogeny by shutting down transposition functions needed for phage DNA replication. It interacts with several repeated DNA sequences within the early operator, preventing transcription from two divergent promoters. It also directly represses transposition by competing with the MuA transposase for an internal activation sequence (IAS) that is coincident with the operator and required for efficient transposition. The transposase and repressor proteins compete for the operator/IAS region using homologous DNA-binding domains located at their amino termini. Here we present the solution structure of the amino-terminal DNA-binding domain from the repressor protein determined by heteronuclear multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The structure of the repressor DNA-binding domain provides insights into the molecular basis of several temperature sensitive mutations and, in combination with complementary experiments using flourescence anisotropy, surface plasmon resonance, and circular dichroism, defines the structural and biochemical differences between the transposase and repressor DNA-binding modules. We find that the repressor and enhancer domains possess similar three-dimensional structures, thermostabilities, and intrinsic affinities for DNA. This latter result suggests that the higher affinity of the full-length repressor relative to that of the MuA transposase protein originates from cooperative interactions between repressor protomers and not from intrinsic differences in their DNA-binding domains. In addition, we present the results of nucleotide and amino acid mutagenesis which delimits the minimal repressor DNA-binding module and coarsely defines the nucleotide dependence of repressor binding.


    Organizational Affiliation

    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, UCLA-DOE Laboratory of Structural Biology and Genetics, University of California-Los Angeles 90095-1570, USA.




Macromolecules

Find similar proteins by: Sequence  |  Structure

Entity ID: 1
MoleculeChainsSequence LengthOrganismDetails
PROTEIN (MU BACTERIOPHAGE C REPRESSOR PROTEIN)
A
69Enterobacteria phage MuGene Names: repc (c)
Find proteins for P06019 (Enterobacteria phage Mu)
Go to UniProtKB:  P06019
Experimental Data & Validation

Experimental Data

  • Method: SOLUTION NMR
  • Conformers Calculated: 50 
  • Conformers Submitted: 26 
  • Selection Criteria: STRUCTURES WITH ACCEPTABLE COVALENT GEOMETRY,STRUCTURES WITH FAVORABLE NON- BOND ENERGY,STRUCTURES WITH THE LEAST RESTRAINT VIOLATIONS,STRUCTURES WITH THE LOWEST ENERGY 
  • Olderado: 1QPM Olderado

Structure Validation

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Entry History 

Deposition Data

Revision History 

  • Version 1.0: 1999-06-04
    Type: Initial release
  • Version 1.1: 2008-04-27
    Type: Version format compliance
  • Version 1.2: 2011-07-13
    Type: Version format compliance