1I7E

C-Terminal Domain Of Mouse Brain Tubby Protein bound to Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate


Experimental Data Snapshot

  • Method: X-RAY DIFFRACTION
  • Resolution: 1.95 Å
  • R-Value Free: 0.261 
  • R-Value Work: 0.212 

wwPDB Validation 3D Report Full Report


This is version 1.3 of the entry. See complete history

Literature

G-protein signaling through tubby proteins.

Santagata, S.Boggon, T.J.Baird, C.L.Gomez, C.A.Zhao, J.Shan, W.S.Myszka, D.G.Shapiro, L.

(2001) Science 292: 2041-2050

  • DOI: 10.1126/science.1061233

  • PubMed Abstract: 
  • Dysfunction of the tubby protein results in maturity-onset obesity in mice. Tubby has been implicated as a transcription regulator, but details of the molecular mechanism underlying its function remain unclear. Here we show that tubby functions in si ...

    Dysfunction of the tubby protein results in maturity-onset obesity in mice. Tubby has been implicated as a transcription regulator, but details of the molecular mechanism underlying its function remain unclear. Here we show that tubby functions in signal transduction from heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors. Tubby localizes to the plasma membrane by binding phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate through its carboxyl terminal "tubby domain." X-ray crystallography reveals the atomic-level basis of this interaction and implicates tubby domains as phosphorylated-phosphatidyl- inositol binding factors. Receptor-mediated activation of G protein alphaq (Galphaq) releases tubby from the plasma membrane through the action of phospholipase C-beta, triggering translocation of tubby to the cell nucleus. The localization of tubby-like protein 3 (TULP3) is similarly regulated. These data suggest that tubby proteins function as membrane-bound transcription regulators that translocate to the nucleus in response to phosphoinositide hydrolysis, providing a direct link between G-protein signaling and the regulation of gene expression.


    Related Citations: 
    • Implication of Tubby Proteins as Transcription Factors by Structure-Based Functional Analysis
      Boggon, T.J.,Shan, W.S.,Santagata, S.,Myers, S.C.,Shapiro, L.
      (1999) Science 286: 2119


    Organizational Affiliation

    Ruttenberg Cancer Center, Structural Biology Program, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Mount Sinai School of Medicine of New York University, 1425 Madison Avenue New York, NY 10029, USA.




Macromolecules

Find similar proteins by: Sequence  |  Structure

Entity ID: 1
MoleculeChainsSequence LengthOrganismDetails
TUBBY PROTEIN
A
265Mus musculusGene Names: Tub (Rd5)
Find proteins for P50586 (Mus musculus)
Go to UniProtKB:  P50586
Small Molecules
Ligands 1 Unique
IDChainsName / Formula / InChI Key2D Diagram3D Interactions
IBS
Query on IBS

Download SDF File 
Download CCD File 
A
L-ALPHA-GLYCEROPHOSPHO-D-MYO-INOSITOL-4,5-BIS-PHOSPHATE
C9 H19 O17 P3
JBQPYAMQMBKZDT-WKBARDANSA-N
 Ligand Interaction
Experimental Data & Validation

Experimental Data

  • Method: X-RAY DIFFRACTION
  • Resolution: 1.95 Å
  • R-Value Free: 0.261 
  • R-Value Work: 0.212 
  • Space Group: P 21 21 21
Unit Cell:
Length (Å)Angle (°)
a = 43.102α = 90.00
b = 51.469β = 90.00
c = 120.834γ = 90.00
Software Package:
Software NamePurpose
X-PLORmodel building
SCALEPACKdata scaling
X-PLORphasing
CNSrefinement
DENZOdata reduction

Structure Validation

View Full Validation Report or Ramachandran Plots



Entry History 

Deposition Data

Revision History 

  • Version 1.0: 2001-06-27
    Type: Initial release
  • Version 1.1: 2008-04-27
    Type: Version format compliance
  • Version 1.2: 2011-07-13
    Type: Version format compliance
  • Version 1.3: 2018-01-31
    Type: Experimental preparation