1FEO

Solution structure of omega-conotoxin MVIIA with C-terminal Gly


Experimental Data Snapshot

  • Method: SOLUTION NMR
  • Conformers Calculated: 50 
  • Conformers Submitted: 20 
  • Selection Criteria: target function 

wwPDB Validation 3D Report Full Report


This is version 1.2 of the entry. See complete history

Literature

Solution structure and backbone dynamics of an omega-conotoxin precursor

Goldenberg, D.P.Koehn, R.E.Gilbert, D.E.Wagner, G.

(2001) Protein Sci. 10: 538-550

  • DOI: 10.1110/ps.30701

  • PubMed Abstract: 
  • Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to characterize the solution structure and backbone dynamics of a putative precursor form of omega-conotoxin MVIIA, a 25-amino-acid residue peptide antagonist of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. The matu ...

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to characterize the solution structure and backbone dynamics of a putative precursor form of omega-conotoxin MVIIA, a 25-amino-acid residue peptide antagonist of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. The mature peptide is found in the venom of a fish-hunting marine snail Conus magus and contains an amidated carboxyl terminus that is generated by oxidative cleavage of a Gly residue. The form examined in this study is identical to the mature peptide except for the presence of the unmodified carboxy-terminal Gly. This form, referred to as omega-MVIIA-Gly, has previously been shown to refold and form its disulfides more efficiently than the mature form, suggesting that the presence of the terminal Gly may favor folding in vivo. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure determination indicated that the fold of omega-MVIIA-Gly is very similar to that previously determined for the mature form, but revealed that the terminal Gly residue participates in a network of hydrogen bonds involving both backbone and side chain atoms, very likely accounting for the enhanced stability and folding efficiency. (15)N relaxation experiments indicated that the backbone is well ordered on the nanosecond time scale but that residues 9-15 undergo a conformational exchange processes with a time constant of approximately 35 microseconds. Other studies have implicated this segment in the binding of the peptide to its physiological target, and the observed motions may play a role in allowing the peptide to enter the binding site


    Related Citations: 
    • Folding of omega-conotoxins. 2. Influence of precursor sequences and protein disulfide isomerase
      Price-Carter, M.,Gray, W.R.,Goldenberg, D.P.
      (1996) Biochemistry 35: 15547


    Organizational Affiliation

    Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. goldenberg@biology.utah.edu




Macromolecules

Find similar proteins by: Sequence  |  Structure

Entity ID: 1
MoleculeChainsSequence LengthOrganismDetails
OMEGA-CONOTOXIN MVIIA-GLY
A
26Conus magusMutation(s): 1 
Find proteins for P05484 (Conus magus)
Go to UniProtKB:  P05484
Experimental Data & Validation

Experimental Data

  • Method: SOLUTION NMR
  • Conformers Calculated: 50 
  • Conformers Submitted: 20 
  • Selection Criteria: target function 
  • Olderado: 1FEO Olderado

Structure Validation

View Full Validation Report or Ramachandran Plots



Entry History 

Deposition Data

Revision History 

  • Version 1.0: 2000-08-23
    Type: Initial release
  • Version 1.1: 2008-04-27
    Type: Version format compliance
  • Version 1.2: 2011-07-13
    Type: Version format compliance