Illustrations of "Macrophage and Bacterium" by Goodsell Win Award in NSF/Science Visualization Contest

PDB contributor and author of the Molecule of the Month series, David S. Goodsell, has been awarded second prize in the 2003 Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge for his illustration "Macrophage and Bacterium 2,000,000X". The challenge is a joint project of the National Science Foundation and Science Magazine that encourages and promotes the visual and conceptual beauty of science and engineering.

Dr. Goodsell is an Associate Professor of Molecular Biology at The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California. His research involves computational chemistry and biomolecular computer graphics. Goodsell's artistic talents are multi-faceted, and include many renderings of molecules and cells that are drawn, painted, or generated with the aid of graphics programs. Previously he was awarded the Association of Medical Illustrators Literary Award, among other distinctions he has received. He has contributed many wonderful installments for the PDB Molecule of the Month feature and has authored the popular PDB Molecular Machinery poster--a recent interview with Dr. Goodsell that further describes these efforts can be found in the PDB Newsletter's Spring 2003 issue.

Dr. Goodsell's winning series of three paintings shows a macrophage engulfing a bacterium, including all of the macromolecules in the two cells and in the surrounding blood serum. Goodsell used hundreds of PDB structures for the paintings to get the sizes and shapes of the molecules right: "The Molecular Machinery poster is a good example of the type of information that I start with when I approach a new painting--lots of structures all drawn at a consistent size."

The full winning entry can be viewed at www.scripps.edu/pub/goodsell/gallery/macrophagebacterium.html. The original paintings are currently on display in the Center for Integrative Molecular Biosciences at The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla.

Part of "Macrophage and Bacterium 2,000,000X" by
David S. Goodsell, The Scripps Research Institute