Estrogen receptor - P03372 (ESR1_HUMAN)

 

Protein Feature View of PDB entries mapped to a UniProtKB sequence  

Number of PDB entries for P03372: 105
 
Function
Nuclear hormone receptor. The steroid hormones and their receptors are involved in the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression and affect cellular proliferation and differentiation in target tissues. Ligand-dependent nuclear transactivation involves either direct homodimer binding to a palindromic estrogen response element (ERE) sequence or association with other DNA-binding transcription factors, such as AP-1/c-Jun, c-Fos, ATF-2, Sp1 and Sp3, to mediate ERE-independent signaling. Ligand binding induces a conformational change allowing subsequent or combinatorial association with multiprotein coactivator complexes through LXXLL motifs of their respective components. Mutual transrepression occurs between the estrogen receptor (ER) and NF-kappa-B in a cell-type specific manner. Decreases NF-kappa-B DNA-binding activity and inhibits NF-kappa-B-mediated transcription from the IL6 promoter and displace RELA/p65 and associated coregulators from the promoter. Recruited to the NF-kappa-B response element of the CCL2 and IL8 promoters and can displace CREBBP. Present with NF-kappa-B components RELA/p65 and NFKB1/p50 on ERE sequences. Can also act synergistically with NF-kappa-B to activate transcription involving respective recruitment adjacent response elements; the function involves CREBBP. Can activate the transcriptional activity of TFF1. Also mediates membrane-initiated estrogen signaling involving various kinase cascades. Isoform 3 is involved in activation of NOS3 and endothelial nitric oxide production. Isoforms lacking one or several functional domains are thought to modulate transcriptional activity by competitive ligand or DNA binding and/or heterodimerization with the full length receptor. Isoform 3 can bind to ERE and inhibit isoform 1. (data source: UniProt  )
Subunit structure
Binds DNA as a homodimer. Can form a heterodimer with ESR2. Isoform 3 can probably homodimerize or heterodimerize with isoform 1 and ESR2. Interacts with FOXC2, MAP1S, SLC30A9, UBE1C and NCOA3 coactivator (By similarity). Interacts with EP300; the interaction is estrogen-dependent and enhanced by CITED1. Interacts with CITED1; the interaction is estrogen-dependent. Interacts with NCOA5 and NCOA6 coactivators. Interacts with NCOA7; the interaction is a ligand-inducible. Interacts with PHB2, PELP1 and UBE1C. Interacts with AKAP13. Interacts with CUEDC2. Interacts with KDM5A. Interacts with SMARD1. Interacts with HEXIM1. Interacts with PBXIP1. Interaction with MUC1 is stimulated by 7 beta-estradiol (E2) and enhances ERS1-mediated transcription. Interacts with DNTTIP2, FAM120B and UIMC1. Interacts with isoform 4 of TXNRD1. Interacts with KMT2D/MLL2. Interacts with ATAD2 and this interaction is enhanced by estradiol. Interacts with KIF18A and LDB1. Interacts with RLIM (via C-terminus). Interacts with MACROD1. Interacts with SH2D4A and PLCG. Interaction with SH2D4A blocks binding to PLCG and inhibits estrogen-induced cell proliferation. Interacts with DYNLL1. Interacts with CCDC62 in the presence of estradiol/E2; this interaction seems to enhance the transcription of target genes. Interacts with NR2C1; the interaction prevents homodimerization of ESR1 and suppresses its transcriptional activity and cell growth. Interacts with DYX1C1. Interacts with PRMT2. Interacts with PI3KR1 or PI3KR2, SRC and PTK2/FAK1. Interacts with RBFOX2. Interacts with STK3/MST2 only in the presence of SAV1 and vice-versa. Binds to CSNK1D. Interacts with NCOA2; NCOA2 can interact with ESE1 AF-1 and AF-2 domains simultaneously and mediate their transcriptional synergy. Interacts with DDX5. Interacts with NCOA1; the interaction seems to require a self-association of N-terminal and C-terminal regions. Interacts with ZNF366, DDX17, NFKB1, RELA, SP1 and SP3. Interacts with NRIP1 (By similarity). Interacts with GPER1; the interaction occurs in an estrogen-dependent manner. Interacts with CLOCK and the interaction is stimulated by estrogen. (data source: UniProt  )
Domain
Composed of three domains: a modulating N-terminal domain, a DNA-binding domain and a C-terminal ligand-binding domain. The modulating domain, also known as A/B or AF-1 domain has a ligand-independent transactivation function. The C-terminus contains a ligand-dependent transactivation domain, also known as E/F or AF-2 domain which overlaps with the ligand binding domain. AF-1 and AF-2 activate transcription independently and synergistically and act in a promoter- and cell-specific manner. AF-1 seems to provide the major transactivation function in differentiated cells. (data source: UniProt  )
UniProtKB:
Species: 
Gene names: Gene View for ESR1 ESR NR3A1
Length:
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The vertical color bar on the left side indicates data provenance.
Data in green originates from UniProtKB  
Data in yellow originates from Pfam  , by interacting with the HMMER3 web site  
Data in orange originates from the SCOP   (version 1.75) and SCOPe   (version 2.04) classifications.
Data in grey has been calculated using BioJava  . Protein disorder predictions are based on JRONN (Troshin, P. and Barton, G. J. unpublished), a Java implementation of RONN  
  • Red: potentially disorderd region
  • Blue: probably ordered region.
Hydropathy has been calculated using a sliding window of 15 residues and summing up scores from standard hydrophobicity tables.
  • Red: hydrophobic
  • Blue: hydrophilic.
Data in lilac represent the genomic exon structure projected onto the UniProt sequence.
Data in blue originates from PDB
  • Secstruc: Secondary structure projected from representative PDB entries onto the UniProt sequence.
Data in red indicates combined ranges of Homology Models from SBKB   and the Protein Model Portal  

The PDB to UniProt mapping is based on the data provided by the EBI SIFTS project. See also Velankar et al., Nucleic Acids Research 33, D262-265 (2005).